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I've been keeping this blog for all of my beekeeping years and I began my 12th year of beekeeping in April 2017. Now there are almost 1300 posts on this blog. Please use the search bar below to search the blog for other posts on a subject in which you are interested. You can also click on the "label" at the end of a post and all posts with that label will show up. At the very bottom of this page is a list of all the labels I've used.

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I began this blog to chronicle my beekeeping experiences. I have read lots of beekeeping books, but nothing takes the place of either hands-on experience with an experienced beekeeper or good pictures of the process. I want people to have a clearer picture of what to expect in their beekeeping so I post pictures and write about my beekeeping saga here. Along the way, I've passed a number of certification levels and am now a
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Sunday, June 11, 2006

Installed the new robber screen

With bees buzzing all around me, I screwed two screw eyes into the back of Bermuda - one on each side.

I used an 18" bungee cord to connect the robber screen to the back screw eye on each side of the hive.


Here you can see everything connected. This was not as upsetting for the bees, since they have been getting used to the robber screen for two days. I put the new screen on Bermuda since it has had a robbing problem. I set the old screen on its side until tonight when finally all the bees had left the old screen and returned to the hive.

Tonight I put screw eyes in to the sides of my original effort at making a robber screen and screwed screw eyes into the back of Destin.

Tomorrow while the bees are flying, I'll install the robber screen on Destin.

I also made a cleat (not sure if I'm using this term correctly?) for each hive so that I could completely close them up if need be. In Jon McFadden's plan for building a robber screen from scratch, he used a router to make a cleat for the top entrance.....

OK, I don't know what a router is, much less what it does. But I did want to be able to close the hive up, so I cut a piece of the wood I used for the side shim the length of the opening at the top of the robber screen. Then I nailed a nail into each end to give the wood a way to hold it up in the opening. So here it is in the picture - although I won't use the cleat unless I truly need to close the hive. Posted by Picasa

2 comments:

  1. Jeff Daniel4:39 PM

    Linda, a Router is very much like a drill. Among the many, many things you can use a router for, the application here would have been to remove a certain amount of wood from the corner or edge of the board to make the cleat.
    I think you did a wonderful job with the robber screen. The window screen idea was a great one and seems to work well. You are pretty brave to put the screen on with the bee's furious all around you. I hope you wore your hat.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Jeff Daniel4:39 PM

    Linda, a Router is very much like a drill. Among the many, many things you can use a router for, the application here would have been to remove a certain amount of wood from the corner or edge of the board to make the cleat.
    I think you did a wonderful job with the robber screen. The window screen idea was a great one and seems to work well. You are pretty brave to put the screen on with the bee's furious all around you. I hope you wore your hat.

    ReplyDelete

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