Welcome - Explore my Blog

There are over 1200 posts on this blog. Please use the search bar below to search the blog for other posts on a subject in which you are interested. You can also click on the "label" at the end of a post and all posts with that label will show up. At the very bottom of this page is a list of all the labels I've used.

Even if you find one post on the subject, I've posted a lot on basic beekeeping skills like installing bees, harvesting honey, inspecting the hive, etc. so be sure to search for more once you've found a topic of interest to you. And watch the useful videos and slide shows on the sidebar. All of them have captions. Please share posts of interest via Facebook, Pinterest, etc.

I began this blog to chronicle my beekeeping experiences. I have read lots of beekeeping books, but nothing takes the place of either hands-on experience with an experienced beekeeper or good pictures of the process. I want people to have a clearer picture of what to expect in their beekeeping so I post pictures and write about my beekeeping saga here. Along the way, I've passed a number of certification levels and am now a!
Master Beekeeper Enjoy with me as I learn and grow as a beekeeper.

Need help with an Atlanta area swarm? Visit Found a Swarm? Call a Beekeeper.

Want to Pin this post?

Tuesday, November 13, 2007

A Sad Tale of Shattered Wax


When the trick-or-treaters had gone on Halloween, I was left with a lot of candy. Well, that's not exactly true. I live in a neighborhood of 80 year old people and there are very few children....so I never get any trick-or-treaters on Halloween, but I always buy a bag of Three Musketeers, just in case this is the year when someone actually says "Trick or Treat!" at my door.

Sadly, this year was no different - no kids in costume knocked at my door. To keep from eating the candy, I took it to my downstairs refrigerator to freeze it. When I opened the upper door to the freezer compartment, a practically unused box of 7/11 foundation, stored in the freezer, crashed to the floor and broke into shards of wax.

The bees made beautiful comb from this wax last year and I made boxed and cut comb honey from it. Now it's all in pieces.

I guess I have several choices. I could save the shards and put partial strips in honey supers next year so the bees could get a start at drawing the beautiful wax for cut comb boxes. I could melt it all into candles.

Lesson learned: Don't store foundation in the freezer.

I should know this. I overnighted some comb-filled frames in the chest freezer to kill wax moths and dropped one when I took it out. That comb also shattered into pieces of wax.
Posted by Picasa

5 comments:

  1. Annette11:18 AM

    Good lesson for me and I will not forget this!!!!

    Thank you
    Annette from Placerville California

    ReplyDelete
  2. Mrs Linda thank you for advice,experience,sometimes � dont understand your w�rds � reguest that �f you use easely w�rds I may be understand your compozotin,as so I dont must be find new w�rd in the dictionary.best regards

    ReplyDelete
  3. www.ilhamiuyar.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
  4. Linda,
    I just found your site and plan to share it with others beekeepers in Illinois and Wisconsin. It's a great source of info, especially the video content.

    I got a kick out of your comments on aster/goldenrod honey. I ended up with about 30 pounds of it from the hives at my apple orchard. Half of the beekeeping club thought it was the best honey they've tasted, the other half hated it.
    Personally, I love it and think it almost has hints of caramel--and I've actually sold quite a bit of it.

    Anyway, thanks again for all the insight. I've been doing this for about 5 years, and it's always nice to learn new ways and hear of different ideas.

    Anthony from Chicago
    P.S. Me and my wife can't wait to try the solar wax melter on our patio in Chicago when it gets warmer!

    ReplyDelete

Pin this post

LinkWithin

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...