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I began this blog to chronicle my beekeeping experiences. I have read lots of beekeeping books, but nothing takes the place of either hands-on experience with an experienced beekeeper or good pictures of the process. I want people to have a clearer picture of what to expect in their beekeeping so I post pictures and write about my beekeeping saga here. Along the way, I've passed a number of certification levels and am now a!
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Saturday, September 26, 2009

No Bees at Home, No Homeless Bees - Blue Heron Update

I have been concerned about the fact that the bees I saw on Thursday night looked like robbers rather than homeless bees. They were approaching the hive in the frantic way that robbers do. But still, if there were still homeless bees in the vicinity of the Blue Heron hives, now gone, I'd want to try to make them a home.

Today it is pouring rain in Atlanta. But it is still daylight. I decided to drive over to Blue Heron in the pouring rain and look at the hives. If any bees are taking shelter in their old home box, they should be there now, taking shelter from the rain.

I arrived in the rain at Blue Heron, put on my muddy tennis shoes and rain jacket and sloshed through the mud over to the hives. No bees were anywhere. I opened the nuc box - no bees. I opened the yellow hive - no bees. I opened Julia's hive - no bees. Her hive had six dead bees on the top of it.

We can now definitely toll the bells for the Blue Heron bees, rest their little souls. All of them are no more.

The bees eating the honey must have been neighborhood robbers or bees who survived the flood but were so worn out that they have died this week.

I didn't move our equipment in the pouring rain - but I'll go get it in the next day or two.

And we'll try again next year.

5 comments:

  1. Anonymous5:06 PM

    Linda:

    I am very sorry to hear about the loss of all those bees and equipment.

    I know you will come back next stronger than ever! You have more adventures with bees than anyone I know.
    You must write a book one day.

    CB

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  2. Oh boohoo :( Just catching up to the blog posts and saw this entry...I'm so sorry.

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  3. Well Linda, at least you can take solace that you tried. I'm certainly glad you tried, and I would have done the very same thing. I thought about you going out there to BH today. It is pouring down rain here too, and I wondered if the weather would hold up there for you to check on them. This coming spring, the new colonies will do better than ever! For the ones that perished at BH, well, now they're foraging in another dimension and will never have to worry about rains or floods again! :)

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  4. Sorry Linda. One of the many tragedies of the hundred year flood. I hope your spring will reward you for all your efforts.

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  5. Dear Linda & other BH Beeks....I am so sorry for the bees and your losses. I love your spirit moving forward to next Spring. All of you did all you could against overwhelming, unexpected odds. Who could have anticipated the flooding in Atlanta?

    ReplyDelete

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