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I've been keeping this blog for all of my beekeeping years and I began my 11th year of beekeeping in April 2016. Now there are about 1275 posts on this blog. Please use the search bar below to search the blog for other posts on a subject in which you are interested. You can also click on the "label" at the end of a post and all posts with that label will show up. At the very bottom of this page is a list of all the labels I've used.

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I began this blog to chronicle my beekeeping experiences. I have read lots of beekeeping books, but nothing takes the place of either hands-on experience with an experienced beekeeper or good pictures of the process. I want people to have a clearer picture of what to expect in their beekeeping so I post pictures and write about my beekeeping saga here. Along the way, I've passed a number of certification levels and am now a
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Sunday, May 19, 2013

Pesticide Kill - Sad Story

Jeff and I checked on the Morningside hive on Saturday.  It was exactly a week ago that I discovered the pesticide kill in front of the hive.  I had been back there for the next three days after the discovery and there were no more new dead bees.

But on Saturday, thousands of new dead bees were in front of the hive.

What this means is in my mind one of two things:

1.  Someone is spraying their garden on Thursday or Friday and the bees are getting into their flowers and dying.  We've had enough rain that after the spraying, the rain washes off most of the poison, but the neighbor who sprays did it again this Thursday or Friday, bringing a whole new wave of thousands of deaths.

2.  The bees are getting nectar from Carolina Jasmine which is blooming in force right now and is poisonous to bees.

The first is more likely than the second.  If the second were the case, then there wouldn't be these gaps in bee deaths.

I'm sick about it - my best hive being brought to its knees buy someone's uncaring act of poisoning their garden.

Jeff and I took the whole hive apart again.  No pesticide smell, but fewer bees, although this is quite a hive.













7 comments:

  1. Hi Linda,

    So sorry to hear that Linda, man I wish people wouldn't spray at all. Or if they have to at least wait until the plant has stopped flowering.

    Giving you a virtual hug across the oceans Linda… :(

    Gary

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  2. I am so sorry to hear this Linda, and I too feel so bad about this sort of thing. Most people don't even consider the pollinators when spraying those deadly poisons on plants.

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  3. Linda, I am so sorry. I thought I had problems yesterday arriving at my beeyard just in time to see a nice swarm gather in the air and disappear into the distance...not so much, hey? Since your bees were likely foraging in the area, it may be helpful to engage the local garden centres/hardware stores who sell garden pesticides to host an information poster in their stores? Or have the local papers run an information/op ed piece?

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  4. That is so sad. Too bad locking the bees in the hive on Thursdays and Fridays isn't practical.

    I agree that an info posting on local paper and signs in the nearby neighborhoods might help.

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  5. I am one of the community gardeners (the bees are in a community garden) so I emailed the gardeners and asked that they talk to their neighbors - hope that helps. Meanwhile, more and more dead bees are there every day.

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  6. Linda, have you enough of a colony left to move them to safer quarters for a while to let them recover?

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  7. I am so sorry for your loss Linda.. I wish that more people would realize that although pesticides are "convenient" for the user... they are not target specific and they are devastating for millions of living things in their path.

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